User avatar
Bulletdust

Posted Sun Sep 08, 2019 10:04 pm

Does anyone know how to change the color scheme in A-Talk III? Pink and brown just aren't doing it for me! Term 3.8 has perfect colors, but pink and brown on a grey background is a little jarring on the eyesight/nerves.

Image

User avatar
Shot97
Detroit, MI, USA
Website

Posted Mon Sep 09, 2019 4:24 pm

There's a default color scheme you can alter in the programs menus, save the setup after. In the phone book, each individual entry can have its own color. Like the colors of one site but not another, you alter them in the address book, making sure to store and save them or else they get reset to default. You can also have up to 8 colors, your setup looks like it's on 4.

To change number of colors
Terminal menu
No. Colors
8

To change default colors
Project Menu: Colors -Alter colors
Project Menu: Save - To save colors as defaults

For individual sites
Phone Menu: Phone Book
Go to each entry and hit colors
Then save

https://youtu.be/7Y53I28PCBQ?t=1367

Also, I'm not sure in your setup if A-Talk is considered to be running in a "full screen" mode. Normally, when running in a windowed mode on top of Workbench it uses Workbench colors. Which, even in your setup with the copper background image, I think it's still technically an 8 color grey 2.01 or above Workbench scheme. A-Talk needs to be running in full screen mode to alter its colors, and the program should be saved when in full screen mode to make that the default.

To change into full screen mode
Project Menu
Screen: Full
Save

User avatar
Bulletdust

Posted Tue Sep 10, 2019 3:20 am

Also, I'm not sure in your setup if A-Talk is considered to be running in a "full screen" mode. Normally, when running in a windowed mode on top of Workbench it uses Workbench colors. Which, even in your setup with the copper background image, I think it's still technically an 8 color grey 2.01 or above Workbench scheme. A-Talk needs to be running in full screen mode to alter its colors, and the program should be saved when in full screen mode to make that the default.
I was actually looking at A-Talk III today before I read your post Shot97 and thinking the color scheme looked a lot like my workbench colors - I believe you're right. The problem is, if I run A-Talk in full screen mode, the scaling goes all haywire creating a full screen window that's black and white and located in the center of the screen - I'm not too sure if it's the software itself doing this or the Indivision, I'm not even too sure what graphics mode or standard (PAL/NTSC) A-Talk III is using in full screen mode as nothing else exhibits this issue, I guess I could check the monitor's menu to see if the mode is PAL or NTSC.

In comparison Term 4.8 is perfect in windowed or full screen mode, but I really want to get A-Talk III running properly and give it a crack.

BTW, I love the comments you've made in the past regarding your father. I lost my father also, he was my best friend and taught me everything technical I know - Not a day goes by that I don't miss him.

Here's Term 4.8 for comparison:

Image

User avatar
Shot97
Detroit, MI, USA
Website

Posted Tue Sep 10, 2019 5:43 am

Term looks to have the correct ANSI EGA kind of look. That's how Particles looks on my DOS machine anyway. That's what I love about A-Talk, lets me use the colors I want and give it an Amiga feel.

I want to say A-Talk is made for NTSC users in mind, and while it will run in PAL mode, was likely meant for a 640x200 medium resolution NTSC display, where in PAL 640x256 medium resolution it would show blackness on the 56 extra pixels. Your setup is probably at least 640x400 or above high resolution.

This is probably why a ton of the board people with Amiga's always point to Term. They got their machines pimped out and I'd never be able to foresee issues there. The only pain in the butt work around I could think of (if you're really wanting A-Talk to work) is booting it from its floppy disk, There you could alter its Workbench colors on the disk, or possibly even have it run correctly in full screen mode, not sure.

User avatar
intric8
Seattle, WA, USA
Website

Posted Tue Sep 10, 2019 6:50 am

@Bulletdust can you tell me which version of A-Talk III you’re using?

I recently got a full boxed version, and it came with a stack of upgrade disks. I don’t think these upgrades are to be found anywhere (yet).

I might be able to help. I think they offer 2.0+ support. Not sure about PAL, tho.

User avatar
Bulletdust

Posted Tue Sep 10, 2019 2:38 pm

Running A-Talk off floppy isn't the end of the world, I could do that. I run 64Door off floppy.

Regarding you point about 2.0+ support Intric8, when I go full screen more it sort of looks like it's trying to take on the appearance of an earlier form of workbench - But that could just be the resolution/scaling issues.

Here's my version Intric8:

Image

User avatar
Shot97
Detroit, MI, USA
Website

Posted Wed Sep 11, 2019 8:44 am

An extremely long thank you for Bulletdust's comment earlier referencing my father and his own:

I really appreciate your kind comments about the mentioning of my dad. He's one of my biggest inspirations for putting my voice out there. Was quite lucky to have a dad nerd, and being around him loving the Amiga in America, I knew his perspective was not being heard online these days. Need more of the old guys telling their experiences, and we desperately need the dominate young (25-50 year olds :P) ones online to listen to those perspectives. One man is just that, but when you combine first hand experiences with research few if any bother uncovering, bringing factual evidence to cushion those opinions, that's when one or a handful can make a difference... or at least bow in defeat knowing you did your part, even if few want to listen. And it's not just for my dad, it's for Jim Sachs and other Amiga legends, even review writers from back in the day, whom I might not always agree with, but who deserve every last one of our readers/viewers combined times a million. For the adults who kept the Amiga alive, who may have occasionally pirated here and there, but who bought 50 dollar games, and 200 dollar word processors. Who enjoyed the Amiga in America until 1995, when Windows 95 finally gave most a reason to upgrade. And they gladly went for a Gateway once they bought out the Amiga...

Wish he was around so I could ask him questions, hell, I'd put him on my videos if he'd be okay with that. He was someone always into the newest and "best" things, so there's no way he'd actively be into the retro scene, but even before he died I was into that, and when I did bring up topics from the past he once cared about, the passion flowed forth. Or a sense of competition even, "Oh son? You say you beat the Gold Box game Champions of Krynn? That one was easy... Try Pool of Radiance...." lol. So he could be an ass just like most of us... But he was right, Pool of Radiance was harder... and he made me want to play that just so I could show him! Though regardless of difficulty, Champions was awesome, so when I reviewed that and talked about my dad I had to kind of maneuver in a certain way, and put words in his mouth... That was his way of smiling and being happy I remembered and wanted to play, and actually beat these games he so loved, but also him saying you've got a long way to go... Perhaps easier than others, but still a blast to play, and worth playing. Hopefully he agrees on that.

I'm not the type to want to give out thoughts on this stuff. I'd rather be on my classic computers and consoles playing the games I love, and believe it or not, a million other hobbies that have nothing to do with computers.... I'd rather be making music or finding new games, software as well. If someone else was out there giving out my perspective, my father's, the other old guys, I'd be happy just to watch them. But it slowly went from a small group of people just happy to play some games to a bunch of opinionated "personalities" making history videos as well as money off Wikipedia research, telling us all the mistakes Commodore made back when they were 5 years old... and of course the first video to pop up if you search out Amiga 500, an American exposed to nothing but DOS computers saying how awful NTSC Amigas are.. Having no clue half or more of the games he's showing off were NTSC... One man can make a difference, but sometimes it does damage... And I couldn't let the Amiga's history in America be written by DOS users who only played shareware games, or only by European Amiga users who only played platforming games, who state as fact that you must get a PAL Amiga because "everything" came out for Europe, American's didn't care, yet over half of the LemonAmiga top games are NTSC... I don't mean to put down these others, or I wouldn't, if they could just think a little deeper and leave the documentaries to PBS or HBO. If a million people are entertained by a documentary, then it's entertainment, it's fiction.

Real documentaries, true histories, they are boring to all but the most passionate of us. It's your computer teacher popping in a VHS tape, done by PBS, showing off the history of micro computers as well as their personalities like Gates, Jobbs, Kildall, Tramell... It's giving you the cold hard facts and making no judgement on them, because you're intelligent enough to put two and two together. It's a zany camcorder recording of the original Amiga team telling their stories... Some of them, no matter how awesomely told, like when R.J. says Mitchie the Dog was the true father of the Amiga, are meant for you to laugh... Look on Jay Miner's face when R.J. claims the dog helped him make design choices... It's obvious that part, perhaps inspired loosely on a real event, but it's not actually true. It's to make you laugh. But a whole lot of other stuff was true. The people are not PBS, some things you take in, some things you don't... Personally I'd take any 5 year olds thoughts from 1990 over a certain former head of Commodore U.K., a lifelong salesman, a suit, who's selling a story, literally selling his story via book and paid speaking engagements... Saying he could have saved Commodore, because he was in the "black" over in Europe... as a subsidiary you better be in the black! It's a whole a different story once you take on HQ's debts/research/manufacturing... He makes a living out of trashing people as well as an entire company who are no longer around to defend themselves... And some people claim he "tells it how it is"... It's not hard to beat up on the dead... It's high time we stop beating up on a long lived company that provided us so much joy. Be careful what you wish for... Nintendo are still around... Apple is still around...EA is still around... and sometimes I wish they were all dead. We all love the Amiga more not because it failed, it did not, in America it was a solid number 2 behind DOS with a whole lot of competition! We love it not because it failed, we don't love it because it was number one, it was not, we love it because enough people saw how good it was, enough knew, enough to get us awesome games/software/hardware, and to get 10 years out of a computer from 1985. We love it not because it kicked everyone's butts, but because it should have, but some others just didn't get it... We love it because we did, we got it. Embrace the end. How many 50 dollar games do you have to sell to make millions? Not all that many it turns out... The Amiga outsold the Apple II, which included 10 years worth of different models! Of course Apple probably made more money off the smaller numbers, for they didn't care about the masses, they cared about the classes. Making the best computer you can for the cheapest price possible may have been the right thing to do, clearly for those who loved the Amiga, but sorry to break it to anyone unaware, doing what's right does not guarantee success, does not always place you first, in fact, it may cause your ultimate demise. What model should have been released at what times, which higher up was using Commodore's money for expensive trips, what advertising they did and when they did them, it's all done and over. Relinquish the decades old wars with Atari, DOS, Apple, even Commodore.... Love it all, and seek out more knowledge from others who love, less from those who hate.

And let me just close by saying the opinions above are very much that, opinions... They were formed based on facts, but I could be full of it as well... The good thing is I don't claim to be writing histories... I give opinions on games/software/hardware... I've never once bought any piece of hardware with the thought of showing it off, getting noticed... It took me over a year of "thinking" I wanted a hard drive for my 500, researching many models, and when I couldn't stop thinking about it a year later, when I already knew I would love it, that's when I got it. Proudly holding onto and using the 500, and I'm doing it with more style than a few others who have way more Amiga's than they'll ever really love. I'm just the people I used to think were good back in 2010 when excitement, fun, and getting in touch with others was the goal. With a touch of good ole dad, and a desire to read way more magazines from 1985-1995 than I care to admit...

Sorry to take such a small statement and blow it up into many paragraphs... i get almost no feedback on my writings these days, and even the videos are pretty much only old Amiga friends saying a short little something like "good stuff", maybe sharing a memory they might have of what I'm covering... There's the obsessed, perhaps on the spectrum types who want to give their opinions but present them as fact, saying my opinion is wrong, and no matter how empirically incorrect those people are or how you tell it back to them, that stuff will always sting and make you want to quit... A troll here and there... Perhaps a handful of likes, and dislikes... and if anyone making videos attempts to tell you dislikes are all good because it's all the same to Google, those people should not be making videos... Dislikes on your proudest moments hurt. A handful of likes from 500 subscribers, only 100 of which watch... Is it the video they like or is it the title? Doing this stuff does little for me other than provide a tiny bit of peace that a different side is being told, and it's actually a side full of love, albeit a bit ornery on the side...

So I truly do appreciate your small comment there about my dad. For me that goes up there with Jim Sachs thanking me for a great review of Defender of the Crown and showing it in a 4:3 aspect ratio like designed but where 99% of online videos and pics show it in widescreen. Recognition, it don't come easy... Sorry about your father as well, Bulletdust. I'm sure your dad and mine would have had some fun chatting! We need more Amiga dad's...or actually Amiga Grandpas at this point. They're the ones that know how rare a game was or was not... They saw it on the shelves! They bought it! They saw SimCity getting high shelf placement from 1989 to 1994! They saw or did not see certain titles. They bought or did not buy certain titles. They bought this game VS pirated a certain other... Upgraded to 1mb RAM... Considered a hard drive, or maybe not... Stuck with 1.2/1.3 or maybe upgraded... Happy with their 500, or perhaps went 3000 or 1200... They had thoughts that are so much more worthwhile than mine... But I do the best i can attempting to channel those without voices, and it means a lot for someone to point out that personal aspect... because it's a rare example of me knowing I did something right, and actually being able to see that instead of just wanting to believe it. Thank you, it meant a lot to me, even if it took me a couple days to acknowledge it.

User avatar
Bulletdust

Posted Wed Sep 11, 2019 2:47 pm

Shot97 wrote:An extremely long thank you for Bulletdust's comment earlier referencing my father and his own:

I really appreciate your kind comments about the mentioning of my dad. He's one of my biggest inspirations for putting my voice out there. Was quite lucky to have a dad nerd, and being around him loving the Amiga in America, I knew his perspective was not being heard online these days. Need more of the old guys telling their experiences, and we desperately need the dominate young (25-50 year olds :P) ones online to listen to those perspectives. One man is just that, but when you combine first hand experiences with research few if any bother uncovering, bringing factual evidence to cushion those opinions, that's when one or a handful can make a difference... or at least bow in defeat knowing you did your part, even if few want to listen. And it's not just for my dad, it's for Jim Sachs and other Amiga legends, even review writers from back in the day, whom I might not always agree with, but who deserve every last one of our readers/viewers combined times a million. For the adults who kept the Amiga alive, who may have occasionally pirated here and there, but who bought 50 dollar games, and 200 dollar word processors. Who enjoyed the Amiga in America until 1995, when Windows 95 finally gave most a reason to upgrade. And they gladly went for a Gateway once they bought out the Amiga...

Wish he was around so I could ask him questions, hell, I'd put him on my videos if he'd be okay with that. He was someone always into the newest and "best" things, so there's no way he'd actively be into the retro scene, but even before he died I was into that, and when I did bring up topics from the past he once cared about, the passion flowed forth. Or a sense of competition even, "Oh son? You say you beat the Gold Box game Champions of Krynn? That one was easy... Try Pool of Radiance...." lol. So he could be an ass just like most of us... But he was right, Pool of Radiance was harder... and he made me want to play that just so I could show him! Though regardless of difficulty, Champions was awesome, so when I reviewed that and talked about my dad I had to kind of maneuver in a certain way, and put words in his mouth... That was his way of smiling and being happy I remembered and wanted to play, and actually beat these games he so loved, but also him saying you've got a long way to go... Perhaps easier than others, but still a blast to play, and worth playing. Hopefully he agrees on that.

I'm not the type to want to give out thoughts on this stuff. I'd rather be on my classic computers and consoles playing the games I love, and believe it or not, a million other hobbies that have nothing to do with computers.... I'd rather be making music or finding new games, software as well. If someone else was out there giving out my perspective, my father's, the other old guys, I'd be happy just to watch them. But it slowly went from a small group of people just happy to play some games to a bunch of opinionated "personalities" making history videos as well as money off Wikipedia research, telling us all the mistakes Commodore made back when they were 5 years old... and of course the first video to pop up if you search out Amiga 500, an American exposed to nothing but DOS computers saying how awful NTSC Amigas are.. Having no clue half or more of the games he's showing off were NTSC... One man can make a difference, but sometimes it does damage... And I couldn't let the Amiga's history in America be written by DOS users who only played shareware games, or only by European Amiga users who only played platforming games, who state as fact that you must get a PAL Amiga because "everything" came out for Europe, American's didn't care, yet over half of the LemonAmiga top games are NTSC... I don't mean to put down these others, or I wouldn't, if they could just think a little deeper and leave the documentaries to PBS or HBO. If a million people are entertained by a documentary, then it's entertainment, it's fiction.

Real documentaries, true histories, they are boring to all but the most passionate of us. It's your computer teacher popping in a VHS tape, done by PBS, showing off the history of micro computers as well as their personalities like Gates, Jobbs, Kildall, Tramell... It's giving you the cold hard facts and making no judgement on them, because you're intelligent enough to put two and two together. It's a zany camcorder recording of the original Amiga team telling their stories... Some of them, no matter how awesomely told, like when R.J. says Mitchie the Dog was the true father of the Amiga, are meant for you to laugh... Look on Jay Miner's face when R.J. claims the dog helped him make design choices... It's obvious that part, perhaps inspired loosely on a real event, but it's not actually true. It's to make you laugh. But a whole lot of other stuff was true. The people are not PBS, some things you take in, some things you don't... Personally I'd take any 5 year olds thoughts from 1990 over a certain former head of Commodore U.K., a lifelong salesman, a suit, who's selling a story, literally selling his story via book and paid speaking engagements... Saying he could have saved Commodore, because he was in the "black" over in Europe... as a subsidiary you better be in the black! It's a whole a different story once you take on HQ's debts/research/manufacturing... He makes a living out of trashing people as well as an entire company who are no longer around to defend themselves... And some people claim he "tells it how it is"... It's not hard to beat up on the dead... It's high time we stop beating up on a long lived company that provided us so much joy. Be careful what you wish for... Nintendo are still around... Apple is still around...EA is still around... and sometimes I wish they were all dead. We all love the Amiga more not because it failed, it did not, in America it was a solid number 2 behind DOS with a whole lot of competition! We love it not because it failed, we don't love it because it was number one, it was not, we love it because enough people saw how good it was, enough knew, enough to get us awesome games/software/hardware, and to get 10 years out of a computer from 1985. We love it not because it kicked everyone's butts, but because it should have, but some others just didn't get it... We love it because we did, we got it. Embrace the end. How many 50 dollar games do you have to sell to make millions? Not all that many it turns out... The Amiga outsold the Apple II, which included 10 years worth of different models! Of course Apple probably made more money off the smaller numbers, for they didn't care about the masses, they cared about the classes. Making the best computer you can for the cheapest price possible may have been the right thing to do, clearly for those who loved the Amiga, but sorry to break it to anyone unaware, doing what's right does not guarantee success, does not always place you first, in fact, it may cause your ultimate demise. What model should have been released at what times, which higher up was using Commodore's money for expensive trips, what advertising they did and when they did them, it's all done and over. Relinquish the decades old wars with Atari, DOS, Apple, even Commodore.... Love it all, and seek out more knowledge from others who love, less from those who hate.

And let me just close by saying the opinions above are very much that, opinions... They were formed based on facts, but I could be full of it as well... The good thing is I don't claim to be writing histories... I give opinions on games/software/hardware... I've never once bought any piece of hardware with the thought of showing it off, getting noticed... It took me over a year of "thinking" I wanted a hard drive for my 500, researching many models, and when I couldn't stop thinking about it a year later, when I already knew I would love it, that's when I got it. Proudly holding onto and using the 500, and I'm doing it with more style than a few others who have way more Amiga's than they'll ever really love. I'm just the people I used to think were good back in 2010 when excitement, fun, and getting in touch with others was the goal. With a touch of good ole dad, and a desire to read way more magazines from 1985-1995 than I care to admit...

Sorry to take such a small statement and blow it up into many paragraphs... i get almost no feedback on my writings these days, and even the videos are pretty much only old Amiga friends saying a short little something like "good stuff", maybe sharing a memory they might have of what I'm covering... There's the obsessed, perhaps on the spectrum types who want to give their opinions but present them as fact, saying my opinion is wrong, and no matter how empirically incorrect those people are or how you tell it back to them, that stuff will always sting and make you want to quit... A troll here and there... Perhaps a handful of likes, and dislikes... and if anyone making videos attempts to tell you dislikes are all good because it's all the same to Google, those people should not be making videos... Dislikes on your proudest moments hurt. A handful of likes from 500 subscribers, only 100 of which watch... Is it the video they like or is it the title? Doing this stuff does little for me other than provide a tiny bit of peace that a different side is being told, and it's actually a side full of love, albeit a bit ornery on the side...

So I truly do appreciate your small comment there about my dad. For me that goes up there with Jim Sachs thanking me for a great review of Defender of the Crown and showing it in a 4:3 aspect ratio like designed but where 99% of online videos and pics show it in widescreen. Recognition, it don't come easy... Sorry about your father as well, Bulletdust. I'm sure your dad and mine would have had some fun chatting! We need more Amiga dad's...or actually Amiga Grandpas at this point. They're the ones that know how rare a game was or was not... They saw it on the shelves! They bought it! They saw SimCity getting high shelf placement from 1989 to 1994! They saw or did not see certain titles. They bought or did not buy certain titles. They bought this game VS pirated a certain other... Upgraded to 1mb RAM... Considered a hard drive, or maybe not... Stuck with 1.2/1.3 or maybe upgraded... Happy with their 500, or perhaps went 3000 or 1200... They had thoughts that are so much more worthwhile than mine... But I do the best i can attempting to channel those without voices, and it means a lot for someone to point out that personal aspect... because it's a rare example of me knowing I did something right, and actually being able to see that instead of just wanting to believe it. Thank you, it meant a lot to me, even if it took me a couple days to acknowledge it.
Well said my friend and absolutely no problem.

I've got some great memories of the man who made me what I am today, including the one where we built the engine for my first car and I got Dad to watch the oil pressure gauge while I cranked the engine over for the first time building oil pressure - Suddenly I heard a 'pop'. I got out of the car, looked up, and there was Dad covered in fresh engine oil head to foot! I put the lines on the external oil filter backwards (air cooled VW)!

The next time we cranked the engine I had to watch the oil pressure gauge...

Miss you Dad, long live the Amiga!

User avatar
Shot97
Detroit, MI, USA
Website

Posted Wed Sep 11, 2019 2:51 pm

Viva la Amiga! And viva all those hobbyist dads!

User avatar
deuZige
Breda
Website Twitter

Posted Thu Jun 18, 2020 3:19 am

Hi there.

I read Bulldust's long post just now and the response of Shot97, about your dad,

And about the problem you've been experiencing with how and by whom the history of the Amiga is being voiced in video's (i'm assuming on YT).

It hit me in the feels, and (to use a popular term these days) i was triggered.

First of all let me say i'm sorry to hear your dad has passed away.

I've lost mine more than a decade ago but i still miss him every day.

He was the one who got me my first computer ever for my birthday, which lead to my infection with the Commodore virus that lasted over 15 years, and leapt from the vic20 to the c16, the c64 and the Amiga.

On my 7th birthday when i got my Vic-20 my destiny, personality and pretty much my whole future would largely be shaped by that machine and its successors.

Who i am now, who i've been since that day in March 1981, despite the misery, grief, sorrow and despair that life threw at me over the past decade. i am alive and stubbornly defiant, because of the Commodores... especially the love of my life, my girlfriend, my Amiga.

One thing that was formed in those early days and which i am trying so hard to pass on to my son is my philosophy of learning things the hard way, as i call it.

Back then there were no manuals in my language, and i didn't speak any of the languages that the manual came in (English and Japanese if i remember correctly) so the only way i could learn how to get the thing to do something was by typing in the commands that were printed in capitals in the book and see what happened. Then try to figure out why most of the times nothing happened or an error message came up.

There was no internet back then so asking other v20 owners for advice or learning from them wasn't an option. I think i was the only one i knew who had a computer at home for the better part of 3 years.

Thinking about those days, and the absolute rage felt when stubbornly typing (with 2 fingers, eyes going from book to keyboard and back every command or parameter of the code) over 5 pages of BASIC from the book resulted in "SYNTAX ERROR" makes my eyes moist to this day.

The memory of the absolute and never surpassed joy and gratification (ecstacy i dare say) i felt later when hours upon hours of stubborn refusal to admit defeat, checking every single character in the program lead me to discover a ; was printed in the manual which should have been a : and finally rewarded me with a running program after typing RUN [RETURN]!!!!

Oh my god, i didn't know it at the time, but it was the closest thing i ever came to an orgasm before i had any notion that my penis could do more than pee!!!!!

From then on i quickly expanded my 'experiments' from simply copying BASIC code from paper into figuring out how to write my own programs "and beyond" and my life was a happy one. March 23rd 1984 came and my dad gave me a new computer for my birthday.

Turns out he was scammed by the guy he bought it from cause he gave me a C16, and not the C64 i had asked for. That C16 lasted for about a week before it was replaced by the C64 it should have been in the first place. (how that replacing went, i learned much much later, was a story on its own but i'll not go into that one now)

That C64 blew my mind and guaranteed i would spend 90% of the time i wasn't in school staring at a color tv banging away at those gloriously brown colored keys. I had become member of the HCC Commodore users group by that time and once a month we'd gather in the school's aula with our computers and exchange eerm... experiences??

Who am i kidding? We copied single byte from each other we didn't already have! At first we copied cassette tapes, on which the software was stored, using boomboxes with double decks! Can you imagine? Press play on one tapedeck and record on the other deck (turn off the volume ofcourse) and then wayt until "CLICK" announced the copy was done....

Oh my goodness, the memories.... Imagine how awesome it was for us when we got ourselves the first 1541's!!! Those once a month gatherings soon became once a week and that exchanging of "experiences" grew into copying as much 5,25" floppy disks as we could manage in 5 hours time!

First single sided, but someone had the genius idea of cutting a notch in the side of the floppy disk so we could flip it and use the other side... doubling the capacity!! oh frack yeah we felt like bad ass hackers i can tell you!!! (we called ourselves crackers, i think)

By then i was deep and completely into (and part of it's dna) the crackscene. The breaking of the copy protection wasn't what motivated us though, contrary to popular belief and most 'historical' articles out there.

Those protections were ridiculously simple and took no more than minutes to take out but what was important to us was the demo or intro that we made and attached to the "release" and being the first to release our crack so it would be the one that everyone else would see on their screens as they started their copy of the game!

We weren't even consciously aware of the fact we were breaking laws (if there even were laws at all. In my country pirating software wasn't illegal until April 10th 2014!!!!)

I was part of the proto demoscene people, "Syntax Error Soft" hanging with groups like "The final Solution" and others in Brabant, a province of the Netherlands....

We were competing with groups like Red Sector, Razor 2992 (yes, the renamed it to 1911 (#777) later), TriStar, Fairlight, Paradox and other "legends" of the scene.

Back then i didn't realize that what we did back then would last more than a few weeks (a few releases later), and was laughing when some guys were talking about our "scene"!!

It turned out we started something that lasts to this day and who knows how long into the future!!

And yes, i admit it, i do feel proud when i think about that, and my ego LOVES every single time i hear/read/think about anything about the demoscene, the warez scene or the pirate scene! Maybe more than i should.... but still, i was there from the start, i was part of it for decades and i still feel some degree of ownership too!

I think you can tell that those days on the C64 were some of the best of my childhood, and i loved every second of it. But as much as i loved the c64 and how much it shaped my life i can honestly say that when the Amiga came i experienced the biggest nerdgasm of my life!

Never has my mind been blown so hard and completely as the moment i met my girlfriend, the Amiga 500! No 64Kb, no cheap synthy mono soundchip sounds, no 80 characters or 16 colors....

The Amiga 500 had 512Kb ram!!!
It had 4 8bit channels of stereo sound up to 28 Khz!!!
It had a resolution of 736×567
it could display 4096 colors on the screen
out of a pallet of 16,8 million colors!!!!!
And the processor clocked in at an unbelievable 7,09Mhz!!!!!

I literally stared stunned and openmouthed in shock and awe from the first second through to the end of the demo that ran when i booted up my girlfriend for the first time!!!

She was, like those before her, a birthday gift (a little late, it was may 1987) that my dad gave to me, and though i thought it impossible before then, she had even more of an impact on me and my life than the v20 and the C64 ever had.

She was my first true and unconditional love of my life and i love her still and i shall do so till the day i die!

I stayed with "the scene" ofcourse, which gradually moved to follow me over time, and i slowly became "one of those" as the PC's began to move from book keeping spreadsheet boxes no one could afford to computers "Real" computer enthousiasts used for work AND fun.

I never stopped fighting the war against the IBM Compatible menace, and fanatically attacked anyone who dared say anything that resembled trash about my girl when all my friends had long since surrendered and submitted to the 80386 or even the 486's.

Turned out it took something completely un-technological and outside of my life experience to rip me away from my girlfriend. It turned out to be MDMA and Hardcore Gabber House and it took me years, enormous amounts of money, and a lot of hard learned lessons before i was able to regain control of my life and merge that Gabber life and my computergeek life into my IT-Specialist career life.

I sold my Amiga 500 back in 1996, and though i still loved the Amiga i never did get myself another one.

I too had become #PCMR, and i still am i suppose. I stopped coding waaaaaay back in 1991, just before i naively dove into the Gabber scene, and i never did get back into coding or developing. I became one of the many, an IT Support Specialist 60-70 hours a week and 'pirating' gamer for the rest of the time except for Saturdays.... that was when i was a Gabber.

That was a good life, and a reasonably happy life, that lasted until 2008.

That year i went to an event called LanCamp. A vacation of 11 days, in an army tent with my friends, hooked up on a LAN to gamerz in other tents spread over a large terrain and... well, you know what lanparties are....

There i met a girl, i fell in love (notice i did not say "We"!) and a few months later we got married.
Another few months later my son was born which was another 5 months before i shockingly found myself to be a single dad of a 6 month old baby with a full time job and huge amounts of debt even 80 hours a week of hard work couldn't keep up with.

I did surprisingly well though for a good 5 and a half years and me and my son lived a good life, and my son was growing into a good, healthy, smart and pretty awesome kid.

This didn't stop child protective services from taking him away from me though. After i lost my job (economic crisis) and lost the fight against debt they had enough to convince a judge i could not provide my son with what was needed to grow up and develop and.....

well....

that is kind of off topic really.

Summarizing lets just say he was placed in a foster family and i see him once a week for 7 hours.

The rest of the time i just spend being an unemployed pauper wasting away my life behind my "battlestation" so my mind hasn't got time to think about my life, waiting until the moment i see my son again. pathetic, i know....

But anyway, from 1987 through till 1996 i lived with my life centered around my girlfriend, the Commodore Amiga!

Right now i can clearly hear Brian Adams's guitar and his voice "Those were the BEST days of my liiiiiiiiiife!"!

And though it's a struggle sometimes, with my son living with an anti-computer 60 year old who only allows him 1 hour per day at a computer and that computer being a Macbook to boot (aaarrgh!!!) i do feel that in the years i got with him i was successful in teaching him the raw fundamental basics of what i wanted to teach him.

Even though there was a high end gaming computer in dad's room i did not let him play the latest games or get familiar with Windows (don't you dare mention the word console!! lol!) until he entered RUN [ENTER] in the c64 emulator without getting SYNTAX ERROR instead of a spinning wireframe sphere. I think that with that, at least, i gave him an important skill and a piece of mentality that he'll benefit from in life.

When he's with me he loves to play games with me, and he streams it live onto youtube, twitch and 4 other platforms. It gives me so much joy to share that with him, and see the joy he has doing it with me that it almost.... almost... feels like enough to carry me over another week without him, without work and without a future. The rest of the strength and energy it takes to get through my life until i see my son again though it truly is the memories of the 11 years of my life that i spend with my girl, my Amiga life!

So reading your post about your dad, your love for the Amiga and how you stepped up in defense of her memory and legacy made me feel good. It is good to know that some of "ÿou kids" do know the history that gave you the internet, gaming, multimedia and well... Computer and game technology today.

That is why i decided to write this reply, and though i have to admit it's a bit longer than i intended and the thing i wanted to reply isn't even in it yet i feel good having written all of this.

So what i wanted to reply?

Thank you! Thank you for loving the Amiga, thank you for keeping her memory alive, thank you for defending her legacy and thank you for doing what, and being who, what would make your dad proud! I'm sure that even if he'd hater everything else about your life, this.... this would make him smile, well up with love and glow with pride. I know that if my kid ends up with a little bit of this when he's at your age, i would.

TL;DR: Thanks! <3





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